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Recommended Readings

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July 1, 1863
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The 20th Maine and Third Brigade on Little Round Top
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Recommended Readings
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Gettysburg: The First Day, by Harry Pfanz

Harry Pfanz's books on Gettysburg are the best books to read to know the battle well. His writing style is easy to follow and he hooks the reader into the flow of events during those fateful July days of 1863. The reader is made to feel as though he is in the mind of the writer as he wrote the book. The book is filled with personal experiences of the soldiers there but also filled with details about the placements of the units that fought there. Advice when reading this book....Read...and read again.

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Gettysburg: The Second Day, by Harry Pfanz

This book by Harry Pfanz details the events of July 2nd, 1863 and includes actions on the battlefield that many other books do not cover such as the activities of both sides before the epic fighting started late in the day on july 2nd, such as the heavy skirmishing that occurred off of the Hanover Road. His writing style is easy to follow and he hooks the reader into the flow of events during those fateful July days of 1863. The reader is made to feel as though he is in the mind of the writer as he wrote the book. The book is filled with personal experiences of the soldiers there but also filled with details about the placements of the units that fought there. Advice when reading this book....Read...and read again.

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Gettysburg: Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill, by Harry Pfanz 

This book by Harry Pfanz details the battle for Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill at Gettysburg. Many visitors neglect to visit Culp's Hill at Gettysburg despite the fact that the most prolonged fighting at Gettysburg took place on the wooded slopes of Culp's Hill.  Again, his writing style is easy to follow and he hooks the reader into the flow of events during those fateful July days of 1863. The reader is made to feel as though he is in the mind of the writer as he wrote the book. Advice when reading this book....Read...and read again.

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 One Continuos Fight: Lee's Retreat from Gettysburg and the Pursuit of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, July 4th-14th, 1863. by Eric J. Wittenberg, David Petruzzi, and Michael F. Nugent. 

It had seemed that no new books could be written about the Gettysburg battle, until the writers of this book provided readers a fresh area to become familar with.  The books is well written and easy to follow.  The reader is immediately amazed at how much fighting continued to occur between the two armies after July 3rd, especially concerning the climactic, midnight battle that took place in the middle of a severe lightning storm at a place called Monterey Pass. The book also gives those who like to visit historical sites a whole list of new places to visit.

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 Plenty of Blame to Go Around: Jeb Stuart's controversial ride to Gettysburg. By Eric J. Wittenberg and J. David Petruzzi.
Again a new area to focus on other than the three days of July 1-3, 1863 on the fields of Gettysburg. The book flows well and is easy to follow. Small Pennsylvania towns thought insignificant by many, will seem much more famous to the reader after reading this book.  Some highlights are battles at Hanover, Carlisle, and Hunterstown, PA.

 

 

 

A Journey in Time by William A. Frassonito.

This book is one of two written by the author focusing on early photography at Gettysburg that is related to the battle. The author clearly uses his military experience in intelligence work to analyze the terrain and geographical features at Gettysburg to identify famous photographs whose exact locations were unknown.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early photography at Gettysburg by William A. Frassanito.

This book expands on Gettysburg: A Journey in Time and opens up the topic of the importance of early Gettysburg photographs in understanding the battle, battlefield restoration, and correct placement of military units.  The book also covers the history of the early maps of the Gettysburg battlefield. In addition, there is an abundance of miscellaneous details about the battle that is not included in other books, including first hand accounts of those who fought there as well as the condition of the battlefield just after the battle.  The reader benefits from William Frassanito's expertise both in the battle of Gettysburg but also in his ability to analyze topography.


Morning at Willoughby Run: July 1, 1863. By Richard S. Schue.

This book is truly "a morning" at Willoughby Run for it does not cover the afternoon fighting of July 1st at Willoughby Run, only the morning fight there.  The book is excellent for anyone wishing to become more proficient in what happened in the early morning hours of July 1st at Herr's Ridge and Mcpherson's Ridge.  Perhaps most intriguing about this book is the epilogue that is filled with interesting stories and information about people and events related to the morning of July 1st at Gettysburg.

The Wheatfield at Gettysburg: A walking tour. By Jay Jorgensen.

The Wheatfield at Gettysburg is one of the most infamous places to visit due to the intense and chaotic fighting that took place there late in the day on July 2nd, 1863. A visitor can easily become very confused when following the many monuments in the Wheatfield and when trying to piece together a chronological order of events there. However Jay Jorgensen breaks up the fighting in the Wheatfield into three stages that makes the activity there understandable and a visit there more fulfilling and less confusing. If anyone is interested in this part of the field, than this book is a must and a good companion book to Harry Pfanz's book Gettysburg: Day Two.

Brigades at Gettysburg. By Bradley M. Gottfried

An excellent reference book. This book is unique in that it does not present the events of the battle in chronological order, but rather the history of each brigade (and regiment in each brigade) is summarized. An excellent quick reference book to aid learning more about what each unit did in the battle of Gettysburg.

 

 

Firestorm at Gettysburg.

An excellent and fascinating book on a different aspect of the battle, namely the experience of the citizens of Gettysburg during those three fateful days of July, 1863. The book is filled with nice photos and first hand accounts of the townspeople  who wrote of their experiences. The book also presents accounts from soldiers of both sides. The book also includes many side stories about interesting individuals otherwise not widely known about who played a role in the battle of Gettysburg.

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